Hard scientific evidence of the effects of diet, pharmaceutical drugs & lifestyle on health from over 1,400 studies from research centers, universities and peer reviewed scientific journals.

My aim is to make this website the No: 1 worldwide go to place to access the actual scientific papers on the subjects of statins, cholesterol and saturated fat.

Research by David Evans

Friday, 28 August 2015

Use of statins associated with a 25% increased risk of pancreatitis

This study was published in Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety 2015 Aug 24
 
Study title and authors
Use of statins and the risk of acute pancreatitis: a population-based case-control study.
Kuoppala J, Pulkkinen J, Kastarinen H, Kiviniemi V, JyrkkÀ J, Enlund H, Happonen P, Paajanen H.
Finnish Medicines Agency, Kuopio, Finland.
 
This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26300102

The aim of this research was to examine the association between statin use and the risk of acute pancreatitis. The study included 4,376 patients hospitalized for acute pancreatitis and 19,859 randomly selected age and sex-matched controls.

The study found that statin users had a 25% increased risk of acute pancreatitis compared to nonusers.

Tuesday, 25 August 2015

Statin use increases the risk of breast and prostate cancer

This study was published in Epidemiology 2002 May;13(3):262-7
 
Study title and authors:
Statin use and the risk of breast and prostate cancer.
Coogan PF, Rosenberg L, Palmer JR, Strom BL, Zauber AG, Shapiro S.
Slone Epidemiology Unit, Boston University School of Medicine, Brookline, MA 02446, USA. pcoogan@slone.bu.edu
 
This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11964926

This study assessed the relationship of statin use to the risk of breast and prostate cancer. The study included 1,132 women with breast cancer and 1,009 men with prostate cancer who were compared with 1,331 women and 1,387 men without breast or prostate cancer.

The study found:
(a) Women using statins had a 50% increased risk of breast cancer compared to women not using statins.
(b) Men using statins had a 20% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to men not using statins.

Thursday, 20 August 2015

Statins increase calcium deposits in the arteries by 7%

This study was published in Heart 2006 Sep;92(9):1207-12

Study title and authors
Progressive coronary calcification despite intensive lipid-lowering treatment: a randomised controlled trial.
Houslay ES, Cowell SJ, Prescott RJ, Reid J, Burton J, Northridge DB, Boon NA, Newby DE; Scottish Aortic Stenosis and Lipid Lowering Therapy, Impact on Regression trial Investigators.
Department of Cardiology, Royal Infirmary, Edinburgh, UK.

This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16449511

A coronary artery calcium scan is a test that looks for specks of calcium in the walls of the coronary (heart) arteries. The amount of calcium detected in the coronary arteries is converted to a calcium score. A high coronary artery calcium score is an independent predictor of coronary heart disease events see here.

Calcific aortic stenosis is where calcium deposits narrow the aortic valve of the heart and decreases blood flow from the heart.

The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of statins on coronary artery calcification in patients with calcific aortic stenosis. The study was a double blind randomised controlled trial, and included 102 patients (who were followed for at least two years) who were randomly assigned to receive either atorvastatin 80 mg daily or placebo.

The study found that patients assigned to statins had a 7% higher increase in coronary artery calcification compared to placebo patients.

Sunday, 9 August 2015

Statins increase the risk of hospital acquired thrombocytopenia in heart attack patients

This study was published in the American Journal of Cardiology 2005 Aug 15;96(4):474-81

Study title and authors:
Impact of in-hospital acquired thrombocytopenia in patients undergoing primary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction.
Nikolsky E, Sadeghi HM, Effron MB, Mehran R, Lansky AJ, Na Y, Cox DA, Garcia E, Tcheng JE, Griffin JJ, Stuckey TD, Turco M, Carroll JD, Grines CL, Stone GW.
Columbia University Medical Center and Cardiovascular Research Foundation, New York, New York, USA.

This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16098296

Thrombocytopenia is the term for a reduced platelet (thrombocyte) count. Platelets are tiny cells that circulate in the blood and whose function is to take part in the clotting process. Platelets are essential in the formation of blood clots to prevent haemorrhage - bleeding from a ruptured blood vessel. An adequate number of normally functioning platelets is also needed to prevent leakage of red blood cells from apparently uninjured vessels.

Percutaneous coronary intervention is a coronary revascularisation technique used in the treatment of ischaemic heart disease. Percutaneous coronary intervention involves non-surgical widening of the coronary artery, using a balloon catheter to dilate the artery from within. A metallic stent is usually placed in the artery after dilatation.

The study investigated the influence of statins on the incidence and prognostic significance of hospital acquired thrombocytopenia, in patients with a heart attack who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. The study included 1,975 patients who received balloon angioplasty.

The study found:
(a) Those who used statins had a 228% increased risk of developing hospital acquired thrombocytopenia compared to those who did not use statins.
(b) Those who developed hospital acquired thrombocytopenia had a 270% higher in-hospital rates of major hemorrhagic complications
(c) Those who developed hospital acquired thrombocytopenia had a 156% greater requirement for blood transfusions.
(d) Those who developed hospital acquired thrombocytopenia had a 33% longer hospital stay.
(e) Those who developed hospital acquired thrombocytopenia had a 400% increased risk of death after 30 days.
(f) Those who developed hospital acquired thrombocytopenia had a 156% increased risk of death after one year.

Friday, 7 August 2015

Higher cholesterol levels associated with higher survival rates in intensive care patients with pneumonia

This study was published in the Journal of Critical Care 2015 Jun;30(3):506-10

Study title and authors:
Decreased serum level of lipoprotein cholesterol is a poor prognostic factor for patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia that required intensive care unit admission.
Chien YF, Chen CY, Hsu CL, Chen KY, Yu CJ.
Department of Laboratory Medicine, National Taiwan University Hospital Yunlin Branch, Yunlin County, Taiwan.

This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25702844

The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic values of cholesterol in patients with severe community-acquired pneumonia that required intensive care unit admission. The study included 40 patients who had their cholesterol levels measured on day 1 and day 7 of their intensive care unit stay.

The study found:
(a) The HDL cholesterol levels of patients who survived by day 7 was 221% higher than the patients who died.
(b) The LDL cholesterol levels of patients who survived by day 7 was 105% higher than the patients who died.

Thursday, 30 July 2015

High LDL cholesterol levels associated with a 15% reduction in hospital death rates in heart attack patients

This study was published in the American Journal of Cardiology 2015 Mar 1;115(5):557-62

Study title and authors:
Relationship between serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and in-hospital mortality following acute myocardial infarction (the lipid paradox).
Reddy VS, Bui QT, Jacobs JR, Begelman SM, Miller DP, French WJ; Investigators of National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (NRMI) 4b–5.
F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, Switzerland. Electronic address: reddy.vanessa@gene.com
 
This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25727079

This study investigated the association between cholesterol levels and in-hospital death rates in patients hospitalized for a heart attack. The study included 115,492 patients.

The study found:
(i) Patients with the highest LDL cholesterol levels had a 15% reduced risk of dying in hospital compared to patients with the lowest LDL cholesterol levels.
(ii) Patients with the lowest HDL cholesterol levels had a 20% increased risk of dying in hospital compared to patients with the highest HDL cholesterol levels.

Reddy concluded: "Lower LDL cholesterol levels associated with increased risk of in-hospital mortality".

Sunday, 26 July 2015

Statin use associated with a 101% increased risk of diabetes

This study was published in Atherosclerosis 2015 Jul 15;242(1):211-217
 
Study title and authors:
Liver fat, statin use, and incident diabetes: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis.
Shah RV, Allison MA, Lima JA, Bluemke DA, Abbasi SA, Ouyang P, Jerosch-Herold M, Ding J, Budoff MJ, Murthy VL.
Department of Cardiology and Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
 
This study can be accessed at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26209814

This study investigated the influence of statins and liver fat on type 2 diabetes. The study included 3,153 individuals who initially did not take statins and were without cardiovascular disease, or type 2 diabetes.

Regarding statins, the study found that individuals who took statins had a 101% increased risk of developing diabetes compared with individuals who did not take statins.